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Respite

Respite Database Service

Autism Nova Scotia is operating a Respite Database in the Halifax and Annapolis Valley area where families can connect with trained respite workers and other respite services. These respite workers have been screened via a background check, a vulnerable sector check and a child abuse registry check 
 

Navigating Respite Support  

Did you know that you can apply for respite funds through the province of Nova Scotia? Have you applied for respites and your application was denied? Are you looking to appeal or advocate to the province? READ MORE 
 

 

Information 

Sub page directory 

Steps to apply for respite funds. 
Interested in applying for respite funds but having trouble navigating Direct Family Support? Please click here. 

 

Understanding the Appeal process. 
If you have applied for respite funds and have been denied, click here. 

 


​Understanding the Appeal process (fact sheet) 

 

Advocating for change. 

If denied funds and interest in advocating further click here. 

 

Advocating for change to government policy. 

Receiving a letter indicating your application or appeal has been denied can be difficult. As an organization, Autism Nova Scotia understands the important or respite on the family.  

With your support, we hope to advocate for change to the current policy that adversely effects many families across the province. 

If you are interested in taking the initiative in changing current policy, the Respite Coordinator Melissa Myers would be more than happy to send you a template that can be submitted to your MLA. 

 

 

 

 

 




What is respite? 

Respite has been traditionally defined as a “short break” for caregivers of persons with disabilities. Recently, respite has evolved to allow respite workers to mentor individuals and assist them with socialization and increase their participation in the community. 

Database Information 

Autism Nova Scotia is operating a Respite Database in the Halifax Area where families can connect with trained respite workers and other respite services. These respite workers have been screened via a background check, a vulnerable sector check and a child abuse registry check. In addition, they have their first aid certification and have been provided with respite training. The database is similar to respiteservices.com that is used in Ontario and has been successful since 2007. The database has cross (dis)Ability applications, but to begin, the service is exclusive to <span style="background-color: inherit;" cl